Category Archives: history

timberline lodge

I used to head up to Timberline every winter Saturday morning when I was little to take ski lessons on the slopes of Mt. Hood. By the middle of the afternoon I’d sneak into the lodge, drink hot cocoa by the fire and hang out with the big ‘ol St. Bernards that roamed the halls. Those days are long behind me, but I can still head up the mountain and curl up by the fire with a cup of hot cocoa (this time spiked with a little peppermint schnapps) and enjoy the wintry wonderland perfectly framed through the big glass windows.


the drive up the mountain
the lodge
ram’s head bar – home of their famous hot cocoa & peppermint schnapps
st. bernard puppies

the last kodachrome lab

If you have rolls of kodachrome film still hanging around your closet like I do, then check out this story. There is only one lab left in the world that develops the iconic film. This film changed the trajectory of popular photography and was memorialized by Paul Simon in one of my favorite songs, Kodachrome. The lab in Kansas will continue to develop this film until the end of 2010, which means I have some photography shoots to schedule! Looking forward to 2010!

today-today_people

lincoln cottage

Seven years ago I started research on the Lincoln Cottage, a small house situated on a hill on the edge of Washington D.C. where Abraham Lincoln spent his summers while President. He couldn’t travel to the Shenandoah Mountains like Herbert Hoover did or Camp David like many modern presidents do now. Our country was at war so he needed to stay close to Washington.

However he needed a place that was quiet, where he could think outside the chaos of Washington, and escape the hot swampy weather surrounding the White House. Even during the usually idyllic summer months Lincoln was often described as sad and restless as he wandered the grounds. During the summer of 1862 while living at the cottage he formed his thoughts on slavery that would he would eventually formalize with the Emancipation Proclamation.

My research led to the restoration of the Lincoln Cottage grounds which are now open to the public. The restoration project was initiated in anticipation of the Lincoln Bicentennial, which was in full swing this week surrounding what would have been Lincoln’s 150th birthday. Leading many of those celebrations was President Barack Obama.

In 2002, when I started this project I would not have believed that an African-American would reside in the White House when the celebration commenced. Now I can’t imagine anything else. In itself it’s the most profound element of the celebration and exactly what Lincoln foresaw as he pondered this very issue at the Lincoln Cottage.

the cottage and grounds in 2002 before restoration

today

today i got to talk about cultural landscapes. today i got to feel like i was sharing my experience with people who appreciate it. today i got to remember wonderful discussions in my old office at fairsted. today i got to remember going to coffee with amy. today i got to feel passionate.

dorris ranch


I’m so excited! My firm and I were awarded the Dorris Ranch project! Dorris Ranch is a public park near Eugene that is also the first commercial hazelnut farm in Oregon and they have some preservation planning issues that we’ll be helping them with over the next year. This was my first project proposal with my new firm and I’m super thrilled and relieved that it all went so well. I didn’t sleep a wink the night before the interview, but it went great and we found out the next week that they wanted to hire us. Of course the question now on everyone’s mind is why are they sometimes called filberts and other times called hazelnuts. My friend Tricia theorizes that Phil and Hazel got in an argument that has never been settled.